9 October 2012

Mummy, I was on the sad board today.

I can't recall how the point of conversation started tonight but as Alban was getting out of the bath it emerged that he hadn't been put on the smiley face chart today. Fair enough I thought, I didn't put every child deserving of it in my class today on my smiley star list.

"I was on the sad board" he states.

Eh? The sad board? My little boy on the sad board??

"Why were you on the sad board?" I ask carefully.

"I didn't do the right thing" he boldly says.

Eh? My little boy didn't do the right thing??

"What did you do wrong?" I ask.

"I put the cars away in the wrong place" he says bluntly.

What?? How the heck is that punishable with the sad board?

"I had to stay in at play and have some thinking time" he adds.

"Really? So you put something in the wrong place and your name was put on the sad board AND you missed play to have some thinking time?" I ask confused.

"Yes" he says matter of fact.

Eh? Really? Can this be right? At this point I thought I would let it go.

Just before bed time I mention that I will speak to his teacher tomorrow.

"I was just joking" he says

Was he? Why would he say he was on the sad board if he wasn't? Is the sad board actually an 'I'm feeling sad' board - Alban was off school yesterday poorly so maybe was feeling a bit low this morning?

But, the whole 'thinking time' sounds like something the teacher would say, I'm sure I've had children sitting in for a bit at playtime to think about their actions.

If it wasn't true where has he got this 'I'm joking' thing from? Is he turning into a liar? If so why?

Tomorrow I am sending the husband in to ask questions. Yes, he is going to go and bug the teacher first thing in the morning but this is bugging me and I need answers.

x x x

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9 comments

  1. I agree, you do need to find out what's going on. It's so hard to know what a small child means and how they comprehend what's going on.

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  2. You do need to find out what's going on, agree. Definitely better to ask rather than assume too with a little 'un! But if it turns out he was lying/joking this is also a developmental step that all kids learn to take.

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  3. When I was helping out in a reception class they had a "mood board" which they all placed themselves on in the morning (or didn't, it was entirely up to them!) Maybe it will turn out to be that sort of thing.

    Either way, I'm sure you'll find out tomorrow :-)

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  4. My 3yr old stepson has recently started saying "I'm joking, I'm so funny" when he's been caught out in a lie, it started just after he began nursery with some older children so maybe its a similar thing? It generally is when he is lying, he doesn't really *get* lying yet I think. Good luck, I hope you get to the bottom of it.. Seems a little harsh if all he did was tidy up wrong.

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  5. Definitely ask the teacher. It could be something simple like a mood board or he may just have been joking. He's probably picked it up in school or something. I wouldn't worry too much, but if he was lying gently explain to him that lying isn't nice.

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  6. It's so difficult to know, isn't it? E is the same age and while he doesn't really lie (that I know of) we quite often don't get the full story. I'm sure it wasn't anything to worry about if Alban seemed ok. Hope you get to the bottom of it.

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  7. Oh bless him and you too x What ever way, good move for your OH to go in. Thing is just because Alban said he was joking when you said about talking to his teacher, doesn't mean he was lying it maybe just he didn't want to be in more trouble. Not all teachers are as lovely as you x Though I would hope at least reception teachers would be a little more thoughtful...x

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  8. I would ask anyway... A teacher of my daughter's once insisted on having a traffic light chart, and put all the "naughty children" in the red section once a day... Sooo negative!!

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I appreciate all comments, thank you! x x

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